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Naughty, and some Yellow

Alert readers (which I assume describes all 6 of mine) may have noticed that though DSH has been a big topic in the past here at Unseen Censer, I haven’t talked about it a lot.

Partly that was because I had everything the brand had to offer, and had been a little less than wowed . . . → Read More: Naughty, and some Yellow

Copy love isn’t lesser love

I should write this post after I receive the bottle of vintage parfum Fleurs de Rocaille that I finally broke down and bought, but after all I decided not to wait.

Because it’s actually FLEUR de Rocaille that I love.

Yes, the one in the much cheaper pink (not Baccarat) bottle.

I bought Fleur de . . . → Read More: Copy love isn’t lesser love

Telling twins apart

Is it just me or is it sometimes hard to tell a flanker apart from its original? I guess if it smelled exactly like the original, I wouldn’t buy it. But I’ve bought two flankers recently that other perfume reviewers (with much better noses) reported as having all these different notes; to me they just . . . → Read More: Telling twins apart

To prevent being ingested

I am delicious, and the way that I know that I am delicious is that outdoor creatures dine upon me every chance they get. When I was younger every bug bite would swell up into a little mountain of horribleness, and I would scratch like you couldn’t believe. I tried everything to get them to . . . → Read More: To prevent being ingested

The Chanel Project: 31 Rue Cambon. Wait for it…

Do you want to know? In the Chanel collection of scents, after No. 5 it’s 31 Rue Cambon. If 31 Rue Cambon were a person, and someday that person passed away, its gravestone would read “Perfume” pure and simple.

On me 31 Rue Cambon opens with that “perfume” perfume note that cause young people to . . . → Read More: The Chanel Project: 31 Rue Cambon. Wait for it…

The Chanel Project: Chance

Upon my first wearing of Chance, I decided that I felt about perfumes the same way I feel about books: awwww, all of them should be loved by someone somewhere.

I’m dead serious about this. I worry about how inanimate objects feel, especially about whether or not they feel lonely and unloved. I used . . . → Read More: The Chanel Project: Chance